Trimming, Pruning, Edging

After all the care and thought that has been put into planting the right trees, plants and shrubs in a landscape, the next steps are maintaining their well-being, improving their quality and helping them grow in the right direction. This is achieved through pruning and trimming.

While pruning and trimming are used interchangeably sometimes, there is a difference between the two. Pruning plants and trees implies the removal of loose, infected, dying, or dead branches. This is done to remove parts that are no longer useful to the plants and trees or are harmful to them. Trimming plants means removing excess growth and cutting back overgrown plants.

Landscape edging helps increase the curb appeal of a property by creating well-defined and aesthetically pleasing lines in a landscape. These lines divide the outdoor space into specific zones while also connecting softscapes and hardscapes. Their practical function is to hold mulch in place, prevent turfgrass from creeping into surrounding areas and maintain clearly defined path areas.

At Down To Earth Landscape & Irrigation, we use the correct pruning and trimming techniques to maintain the overall health of the landscape. We use edging materials that match the aesthetics of the rest of a landscape and create a consistent theme.

Frequently Asked Questions

For North Florida lawns, non-spring flowering shrubs and existing trees should be pruned in January and roses should be pruned in February. Azaleas can be pruned in March.

For Central Florida landscapes, fruit trees should be pruned in January. For Central and South Florida landscapes, non-spring flowering shrubs and trees should also be pruned in January to improve form. The remaining shrubs and trees should be pruned in March, when the growing season begins after the dormant months. 

Summer flowering shrubs in all regions should be lightly pruned in June. Dead blooms can be pruned every month to improve growth.

For South Florida landscapes, trees should be prepared for hurricane season in June. This does not imply ‘hurricane pruning’ or ‘pineapple pruning’; rather, the trees should be checked for dead or loose branches and pruned if required.

Apart from making the plants stronger and sturdier, there are other benefits of pruning and trimming:

  • It helps to manage pests and insects better. If the insects in the landscape are not controlled in time, they can cause severe damage. 
  • While they don’t kill plants directly, insects spread diseases that weaken plants and trees. 
  • If these plants are too close to buildings, the insects can enter and cause pest infestation.
  • Loose, dying, and dead branches are a serious safety hazard for buildings, especially the people living there. They can fall at any time, damaging buildings, vehicles, and injuring people.

There are various types of landscape edging to suit the theme and preference:

  • Mulch Capture: This is used to keep a heavily mulched bed from spilling out. This material generally extends two inches above the ground.
  • Mowing Strip: A flat, wide material is used to create a firm path suitable for the wheels of a lawnmower.
  • Lawn and Garden Divider: This is a trenched or shallow edge dividing the lawn and garden beds.
  • Beauty Edging: This is done to add to the aesthetic appeal of the landscape, and can be used as any material according to the predetermined style.

Other Maintenance Services

Aeration & Overseeding